I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men

I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.
In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.
Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   
In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.
Apichatpong Weerasethakul on his short film Mobile Men
I have been interested in a topic of extinction for a while, the extinction of species, of voices, of tradition, and of cinema. Thai society on the surface looks peaceful, however, there are so many injustices going on that contribute to the elimination of “the other”. The government uses the terms such as “Preservation of the Thai Values” and “National Security” as pretexts to destroy different opinions, beliefs, and cultures. I come across too often news about discrimination and violence towards minorities. In 2006 and 2007, at the peak of the military-controlled regime, five provincial governors in Thailand have issued regulations that prohibits migrant workers from leaving their designated housing at night, prohibits them from using mobile phones, and from gathering together outside of their houses in groups of more than five. The decrees are specifically enforced on the workers from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia, despite the fact that Thailand has migrant workers from various countries. Even though there are strong protests from human right groups, until now the decrees have not been nullified. This decrees led to the unsightly episodes such as extortions by the police and the arrests of migrant workers who participated their cultural events at the temples.

In my recent short film, the main actor is played by a migrant worker from Shan state in Burma named Jaai. The shooting of this film provided me a great opportunity to learn from his stories. He is one of the lucky ones who have decent jobs and are contented with the new living condition. But there exist many others who are still living in the opposite circumstances. For this film project, Mobile Men, it is a portrait of Jaai. By the act of making the film, I would like to instill and capture his confidence and dignity. It is not about storytelling, but about a man who is full of life.

Making film is the most liberating act for me. I often work with the same crew and actors who become good friends over the years. So every time we are making a film, it is like a carnival. I would like to introduce Jaai into this world of ours. We are creating semi-parallel universes – of real life and of imagined life. These two lives are at times cross path. I put real people’s gestures and stories into a film. It is true that Human Rights are real, but the “presentation” of the topics is always subjective. I try to convey this idea of “no boundary” or at least “less boundary” between the making and what you see.   

In Mobile Men, the cinema is a tool to create self-awareness. It is important for one to be proud of one’s own existence and recognize it in the others. Here the situation is choreographed as a movie-making game to celebrate youth, beauty, and dignity. The film honors simple gestures that mark individuality through visual exchanges. I hope the viewers realize that, when the actors and a director are holding a camera and shoot, we are destroying a discriminating barrier. The pickup truck simulates a small moving island without frontiers where there is freedom to communicate, to see, and to share.

Venezia HOLOCHAOS #0

Daje oh porcaddio che qua nun se move più gnente (ma manco a venezia che vi credevate)

Birdman

Non ho mai visto un film di robottoni e tizi in calzamaglia ma scommetto che sono tutti mille volte meglio di questa cagatona wannabe intellettuale con gli occhialetti

The President

È noto l’amore degli iraniani per i tarallucci col vino, ma qui si esagera

The look of silence

Ciao indonesiani subumani,…

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akin’s justifications for making a movie where armenians speak in english:

  • I have an hip-hop culture
  • I didn’t want an armenian teaching his language on the set
  • I don’t understand armenian
  • I didn’t cast any armenian actors because there is none
  • armenians will thank us because now everyone will think that they know how to speak english

can someone please set him on fire and then bash his head with a fire extinguisher?

tip for fatih akin: you don’t make a movie about the armenian genocide with non-armenian actors who act as armenians speaking in ENGLISH WITH A FUCKING ACCENT

it’s so sad and moving to see all these white high class bourgeois shitheads emphatize with those poor indonesian savages after seeing oppenheimer’s movie while sipping their cocktails 

It’s disconcerting that only months ago, I was mired in mud while shooting the film in a remote village in Cagayan Valley. I’d never imagined that this film would take me to a manicured resort frequented by the bourgeoisie … to receive an award in an A-list festival.

The Golden Leopard is really golden. But it’s just 0.001 of the missing Marcos gold. Filipino filmmakers have to win the gold prize every year for the next 100 years to retrieve the Marcos loot in Swiss banks

- Lav Diaz on his victory at the Locarno International Film Festival

whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)
di Linda Rigotti
foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.
whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)
di Linda Rigotti
foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.
whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)
di Linda Rigotti
foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.
whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)
di Linda Rigotti
foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.
whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)
di Linda Rigotti
foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.

whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (documentazione del ritorno e dell’espansione)

di Linda Rigotti

foto di scena del video prodotto durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.

whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (condizioni di parallelismo) - frammenti -
di Linda Rigotti
foto di documentazione del progetto realizzato durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.
whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (condizioni di parallelismo) - frammenti -
di Linda Rigotti
foto di documentazione del progetto realizzato durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.

whileistandbythislake:

Allora sarei finalmente dove non c’è più fine (condizioni di parallelismo) - frammenti -

di Linda Rigotti

foto di documentazione del progetto realizzato durante la residenza SenseOfCommunity 9, 2-9/08/2014, Forte Stella.